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Barbara McBride-Smith

STORYTELLER
Mama believed the woman who dies with the most fabric scraps wins. She saved scraps from odd sewing job for neighbors. She saved buttons from old winter coats and birthday dresses. Mama had a button from Daddy's first uniform and another from Grandma's cloth coat—and every button in the box came with a story. In her trademark Texas twang, award-winning storyteller Barbara McBride-Smith recounts stories from her family that speak to all of us.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. The Button Box (7:14) A mother who lived through the Great Depression saves everything, especially buttons. Two generations later, the buttons are still holding the family's stories together. 2. … A cowboy was on the lid (5:32) 3. … Daddy's overall buttons (6:20) 4. … Button from Ireland (5:04) 5. … Mama passes on the box (5:15) 6. … Troubles with Adam (6:04) 7. A Joyful Noise (7:45) A daughter learns that singing the right words isn't as important as finding the truth in the song. The mother's discordant voice endures because her songs are built on the human heart. 8. … Mama's 90th birthday (5:01)

REVIEWS
VOYA
"When telling of her mother's button box, the slapstick humor is shoved aside for a serious, nostalgic look at family life imparted through the buttons cut from various garments. McBride-Smith's Texas-accented voice jumps easily among humor, dialogue, and sadness, adding emphasis where needed."
Eve has her own story, and she's been waiting millennia for Barbara McBride-Smith to tell it. It's the same for Mrs. Noah. If ever there were two misunderstood or under-appreciated women! Barbara McBride-Smith has singled them out for her trademark feminist humor. Following Eve and Mrs. Noah's stories are four of McBride-Smith's retellings of Greek Myths from her west Texas good-ole-girl persona. There's Theseus, one of the heroes of Greek mythology who turns out to have "a few cogs without a matching ratchet." And then there's Bacchus, the Greek god of wine. He was born without a mother, and he had a hard childhood. Yet as McBride-Smith explains, he goes on to be the patron saint of all women (and all hearty partiers)!

AWARDS
Storytelling World Award

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Adam (2:53) Tradition says Adam was created first. But was he? Eve has a different version of how it all began. 2. Mrs. Noah (14:28) Noah's wife, a guest on Oprah's TV talk show, tells her side of the story about that nightmarish cruise on the ark. 3. … God says to take a couple of animals 4. Theseus (19:21) One of the greatest heroes of Greek mythology turns out to be a guy who "had a few cogs without a matching ratchet." 5. … Theseus goes to Athens 6. … Ariadne to the rescue 7. Bacchus (12:34) The Greek god of wine, born without a mother, had a tough childhood. But he became the patron saint of all women and taught the world how to party. 8. … Zeus intervenes and saves Bacchus

REVIEWS
VOYA
"McBride-Smith turns Biblical stories and mythology upside down as she jazzes up the classic tales of Eve and God; Mrs. Noah, the ark, and Noah's grape vines; party-goer Bacchus; and poor old Pandora who can't resist opening that box. McBride-Smith's Texas-accented voice jumps easily among humor, dialogue, and sadness, adding emphasis where needed."
Award-winning storyteller Barbara McBride-Smith breathes life—albeit a wizened Texan version—into the old Greek myths. With her incurable Texas drawl, she spins the Greek myths as you've never heard them before, rendering them 99% more fun while retaining 100% of their original insights into the crooked ways of the human heart—and the no-less crooked ways of the ancient Greek gods.

AWARDS
2006 Storytelling World Award Winner

TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. PANDORA (12:07) According to the Greeks, she was the first woman created. Her finest gift from Zeus was curiosity. Her most precious gift to humankind was hope. 2. … She took the box out of the closet. 3. DEMETER AND PERSEPHONE (14:19) Demeter, the goddess of growing things, tells how her daughter was kidnapped by Hades, the god of the underworld. Because of Demeter's power over nature, Hades is forced to return Persephone to her mother, but for only half of each year. 4. … Demeter went to a barn dance. 5. JUDGMENT OF PARIS (11:55) Paris, a Trojan prince predicted Least Likely to Succeed by an oracle, judges a beauty contest and decides who is the fairest of three goddesses: Hera, Athena, or Aphrodite. In the end, he discovers what baaad could happen! 6. … A scuffle erupted. 7. MEDUSA (0:00) When Athena's temple is defiled, she takes her revenge on Medusa, a beautiful young woman, and turns her into the ugliest monster in Greek mythology. 8. … Perseus's birth 9. … Medusa decapitated

REVIEWS
VOYA
"McBride-Smith turns Biblical stories and mythology upside down as she jazzes up the classic tales of Eve and God; Mrs. Noah, the ark, and Noah's grape vines; party-goer Bacchus; and poor old Pandora who can't resist opening that box. McBride-Smith's Texas-accented voice jumps easily among humor, dialogue, and sadness, adding emphasis where needed."
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$16.95
$16.95
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$14.95
“Hello Ricky Nelson, Goodbye Heart”
Recorded LIVE at the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival
By Barbara McBride-Smith
Running time: 57 minutes
Shady Lady Productions, 2010

                  The Ricky Nelson CD won the “2011 Storytelling World Award.”

                    Here’s the website:

Barbara McBride-Smith’s one-woman show “Hello Ricky Nelson, Goodbye Heart” is a nostalgic look back at the life and times of a teenage idol and his influence on the Baby Boomer generation. Even though Rock n’ Roll was considered scandalous in the mainstream of the 1950’s, “that nice Nelson boy” smuggled it into American living rooms and made it acceptable to parents. For teens of that era, like Barbara, Ricky Nelson was blue-eyed sweet-voiced heartthrob who could have lived right next door … but he didn’t. Next door was Charlie D. who teased and taunted his way into Barbara’s heart and became the closest thing to a brother she ever had.

REVIEWS
Troy Messenger, June 2010:

“Thanks to Barbara McBride-Smith, I’m a storytelling convert. Her performance of the Ricky Nelson story was a walk down memory lane. I laughed and I cried but, most of all, I remembered. I think all of us who grew up in the 1950’s and 60’s got to go back ‘home’ for a little while. It was wonderful to be there!”
$16.95
http://www.storytellingworld.com/2011/